Coalition set to launch policy on NBN

Opposition communications spokesman Malcolm Turnbull is likely to release the Coalition's long-awaited policy on the national broadband network as early as next week.

Opposition communications spokesman Malcolm Turnbull is likely to release the Coalition's long-awaited policy on the national broadband network as early as next week.

Mr Turnbull said the release of the broadband policy was "very imminent" during his trip to Tasmania promoting his version of the NBN to IT executives there. "I don't think there'll be any surprises in it, frankly," he said.

It is rumoured that Mr Turnbull will release the alternative broadband policy at an industry conference next week.

In a speech in Melbourne on Thursday night, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott said he would repeal the Labor government's mining tax and carbon tax and shut down government agencies such as the Department of Climate Change.

"We will stop throwing good money after bad on the NBN," he said.

Mr Turnbull restated the Coalition's commitment to finishing its version of the network, which is likely to involve using Telstra and Optus' existing HFC cable - or TV cable - network.

"We will complete the construction of the NBN," he said. "We're not going to tear it up or cancel it or do any of those terrible things that Julia Gillard says we will.

"The idea that I'd be destroying valuable investments in telecoms infrastructure - that's the sort of thing the Labor Party might do, it's not something I'd ever do."

The core of the Coalition's alternative version of broadband is to roll out fibre to cabinets on streets but not to homes, involving using Telstra's copper wire for "last mile" connection to homes.

Mr Turnbull is believed to prefer to roll out fibre to areas where there is no existing HFC cable network. However, telco operators oppose any alternative policy involving the continued use of the Telstra pay TV cable network.

NBN Co chief executive Mike Quigley admitted recently that the rollout would be delayed by three months, blaming a lack of construction workers.