EDITORS' PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide, Kohler looks at how central banks will deal with unemployment, Gottliebsen looks at the outlook for rates and Bartholomeusz examines Goldman Sachs' shift back towards risky investments.

KGB TV: Harold Mitchell
Kohler, Gottliebsen
The chairman of Mitchell Communication has no intention of selling his stake in the company to WPP and says digital could rise to account for up to 25 per cent of ad dollars, from its current share of around 14 per cent. 

Policy without ammunition
Alan Kohler
The Fed and the RBA have both declared victory over inflation, but not unemployment. Worse, however, is that the two obvious policy responses – printing money or borrowing for fiscal stimulus – are no longer effective options.

Solving the rates riddle
Robert Gottliebsen
There are mixed signals in the market about whether rates will rise from here on in. However, by looking closely at bank funding and investor behaviour, it becomes clear that they are most likely headed north.

Basic banking instincts
Stephen Bartholomeusz
Goldman Sachs has returned to the kind of risky behaviour that caused the global financial crisis. If regulators don't curb the banks' intense competitive instincts, Morgan Stanley looks set to follow suit.

Westpac's brave new world
Tony Boyd
While the RBA is unsure, Gail Kelly is confident the rates cycle has bottomed and is predicting rising rates for the bank's loan customers and a wholesale funding environment that may never be the same.

Don't miss the rally
Q&A by Isabelle Oderberg
Now is the time to buy into the ASX as it heads for 4900 by June 2010, says Credit Suisse equity strategist Atul Lele, who also predicts commodity prices will rise 15 per cent this year.

Scrapping petrol guzzlers
Giles Parkinson
Better Place founder and CEO Shai Agassi predicts there will be one billion electric cars on the world’s roads by 2020, and not long after that petrol-fuelled vehicles will be a mere curiosity.

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