US technology university to foster entrepreneurial mindset

A partnership between American and Israeli universities, backed by New York City's government, aims to establish the leading technology educational institution in the world by combining the best know-how from academic and commercial worlds.

A partnership between American and Israeli universities, backed by New York City's government, aims to establish the leading technology educational institution in the world by combining the best know-how from academic and commercial worlds.

A deal between Cornell University, a top-rated Ivy League college, and Technion - Israel Institute of Technology has led to the creation of Cornell NYC Tech. The new university, specialising in applied sciences, opened its doors to 30 students this year in Manhattan office space donated by Google.

In 2017, a campus is scheduled to open on Roosevelt Island on New York City's East River, the result of a $US100 million ($111 million) investment by the city to position itself as a leading technology and education centre.

"Our goal is nothing short of creating the pre-eminent graduate campus focused on digital technologies and on technologies of the information age," said Daniel Huttenlocher, dean of Cornell NYC Tech.

"We want to emphasise an entrepreneurial mindset," he added, explaining the type of students - and faculty staff - the university intends to attract.

"This is not necessarily someone who runs out and starts businesses. I like to think of it as the 'ask for forgiveness rather than permission' mindset. It is the kind of person who is going to go out there and be very proactive about getting things done."

The university will focus on postgraduate courses including master's programs and doctoral studies with an unapologetic focus on bridging the gap between academia and business.

"Universities don't have good skill sets or track records in doing things in the commercial world," said Professor Huttenlocher. "This is a place where new technologies can be proven and then moved out into the commercial world."

Full story —smh.com.au/it-pro

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