Picks of the Week

In this week's essential reading guide, Kohler bemoans housing's curse, Gottliebsen identifies the reasons investors are turning their back on Australia and Bartholomeusz analyses the iron ore market.

Parking on busy roads is idiotic
Alan Kohler
Governments around Australia are devoting billions of dollars to new infrastructure projects to unclog busy roads, but getting rid of parked cars is a much easier solution.

Why Rinehart's empire will survive the iron ore slump
Robert Gottliebsen
As the iron prices plumbs to new depths, the challenges will only heighten for Gina Rinehart's Roy Hill project. But there are a few reasons why the house of Hancock will withstand a tough market.

Keep away from the edge as iron ore cracks
Stephen Bartholomeusz
Fortescue believes rationality will prevail in China’s domestic production, but less competitive local producers should be considering a long-term price not far from $US70 a tonne, with potentially volatile periods in both directions.

We're becoming a nation of landlords and renters
Callam Pickering
As property speculation reaches its highest point in history, it's pertinent for policymakers to ask whether increasing levels of investment are desirable.

Labor puts up a 'no exit' sign for Abbott
Rob Burgess
As petrol prices look set to accelerate, Labor aims to lock the Coalition into its roads policy with a counter-plan for rejuvenated urban public transport.

Putting China's economic reforms into perspective
Peter Cai
China's stuttering economy has led many to question its commitment to reform. But while there will be challenges ahead, history shows the country has come a long way.

The toxic combination turning investors off Australia
Robert Gottliebsen
Australia has been a successful yield play for international investors in recent years, but now the world is turning its back on the lucky country.

The IMF's policy prescriptions are wrong for Australia
Adam Carr
While Australia's policymakers fret over changes in the rate of inflation, there's a deeper problem that will trouble the economy.

The insidious creep of ‘fascist’ obsession
Rob Burgess
Looking at the numbers, inflammatory comments about aggressive forms of Islam ‘taking over’ are ludicrous.

Banishing the hippies from the energy-climate debate
Tristan Edis
Yet another report has come out explaining how technology, not hippie communes, can allow us to address climate change. It builds on countless earlier reports that embrace the importance of energy rather than 'kumbaya'.

Most commented

Regulators are finally bringing balance back to the housing market
Callam Pickering
Plans by the RBA and APRA to slow lending in the housing sector are a step in the right direction, although they won't solve the market's affordability issues.

Most read

Housing: the curse that keeps on cursing
Alan Kohler
Much hysteria surrounds Australia's rising house prices, but the heart of the problem lies with monetary policy.