Outrage over Japan PM's gift to war shrine

China says the gift of a tree to Japan's controversial war shrine is a slap in the face for US President Barack Obama, who arrives in two days' time.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's gift to the controversial Yasukuni war shrine has sparked a Chinese charge that he was offering "a slap in the face" to US President Barack Obama days ahead of his visit.

The unapologetically nationalist Abe on Monday donated a sacred masakaki tree to coincide with the start of a three-day festival, a shrine official said.

The sending of a gift has been seen as a sign that Abe does not intend to go to the shrine - as he did on December 26, sparking fury in Asia and earning him a diplomatic slap on the wrist from the United States, which said it was disappointed.

Yasukuni Shrine honours Japan's war dead, including some senior military and political figures convicted of serious crimes in the wake of the country's World War II defeat.

That, and the accompanying museum, which paints Japan as a frustrated liberator of Asia and victim of World War II, makes it controversial, especially in China and South Korea, where it is seen as a symbol of Japan's lack of penitence.

Abe and other nationalists say the shrine is merely a place to remember fallen soldiers. They compare it with Arlington National Cemetery in the United States.

Masaru Ikei, an expert on Japanese diplomacy and professor emeritus at Keio University, said that with Obama due to arrive on Wednesday for a state visit, Abe was always likely to stay away from the shrine.

"The prime minister does not want to worsen ties with China and South Korea before President Obama's visit. But he does want to maintain his creed that he should pray for the war dead," he told AFP.

Ikei said Washington's public and slightly unexpected rebuke after his last visit meant Abe "will not be able to visit the shrine again for a while".

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang, speaking at a regular briefing on Monday, said Japan needed to "face up to and deeply reflect on its history of aggression and make a clean break with militarism".

The South Korean foreign ministry also issued an angry statement.

"Our government cannot but deplore Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's offering to the Yasukuni Shrine, which enshrines war criminals, in glorification of Japan's past invasion and colonisation, as well as war aggressions," it said.

Many conservative lawmakers are expected to go to the shrine to mark the spring festival on Tuesday.

In a further sign of their parlous state, Japanese shipping giant Mitsui OSK Lines said China had seized one of its ships in a row over what Beijing says are unpaid damages relating to events in the 1930s.


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