NBN fans rally to sway Turnbull

Broadband supporters are raising money on the internet to pay for an advertising campaign in Malcolm Turnbull's electorate, hoping to convince the Communications Minister to keep Labor's fibre-to-the-home national broadband network.

Broadband supporters are raising money on the internet to pay for an advertising campaign in Malcolm Turnbull's electorate, hoping to convince the Communications Minister to keep Labor's fibre-to-the-home national broadband network.

An online crowd-funding group has raised more than $25,000 in two days for ads in community newspapers calling on the minister to "build the NBN that Australia is asking for".

The project was started by the same group of students in their 20s that started an online petition calling on Mr Turnbull to reconsider the Coalition's fibre-to-the-node plan for the "superior" fibre-to-the-premises network.

This has attracted more than 266,400 signatures since being launched by Queensland student Nicholas Paine the day after the election.

Mr Paine has since formed a group that was asking for donations to fund an advertisement in the Wentworth Courier.

Mr Turnbull holds the seat of Wentworth with a comfortable margin of 17.7 per cent, but the group said it would also advertise in marginal electorates of newly elected Liberal MPs if it raised

more than the initial target of $15,000.

By noon on Friday they had raised $25,499 on crowd funding site Indiegogo and were accepting donations for nine more days. "We want to go beyond the political divide that is occurring at the moment ... We believe that fibre to the premises will be a lot cheaper to run in the long term," spokesman Alex Stewart said.

Mr Turnbull said he welcomed more advertising for his local paper. He has previously responded to the petition by saying he would not walk away from the election result.

"While I respect the enthusiasm of those who have contributed to crowd funding this advertising, I know the Wentworth community very well and overwhelmingly they are very keen to find out how much this project is going to cost, in time and dollars, and how a rational government might go about making the rollout more efficient," he told Fairfax Media on Friday.

Crowd funding was recently used by technology news website Delimiter to raise more than $2000 to pay for a freedom-of -information request for the incoming government briefing, known as the Blue Book, on the NBN.