EDITORS' PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide, Kohler explains why there are still tough times ahead for the economy, Gottliebsen looks at America's struggling housing sector and Bartholomeusz tells why we need a strong corporate bond market.

Oracles of the economy
Alan Kohler
Reading over three separate speeches yesterday it is quite clear that Don Argus, Ken Henry and Ross Garnaut agree on one thing: there are still tough times ahead for the economy.

Registering investor rage
Alan Kohler
The Federal Court has ruled that aggrieved investors wanting to pursue class actions must register them as managed investment schemes. This is ridiculous and cannot be allowed to stand.

Mapping Australia's growth path
Robert Gottliebsen
As Australia moves from fearing recession to expecting strong growth there is great confusion as to what the economy will look like in the near future – the picture is clearer than many think.

What's inside the American pie?
Robert Gottliebsen
There are encouraging signs emerging in the US economy, but if you drill deeper you discover that there remains a rotting core – including seven million properties entering foreclosure.

The Argus ultimatum
Stephen Bartholomeusz
If Australia's corporate bond market is not drastically improved the massive number of resources and infrastructure projects being planned will be at risk, as will the economy.

For King and country
Stephen Bartholomeusz
Bank of England Mervyn King's provocative contribution to the debate on banking reform gives preference to the collective interest of the nation and will have the banks around the world running scared.

Why BHP's China is different
Isabelle Oderberg
With Rio Tinto facing some major challenges in China, many are wondering why BHP Billiton has not found itself in the same mess. However, the answer is actually quite simple. 

Our new giant trade partner
Q&A Isabelle Oderberg
ASEAN will overcome its squabbling to pull together an economic community as effective as the EU and more important to Australia than India, says Austrade ASEAN boss Rod Morehouse.

Curiouser and curiouser carbon
Giles Parkinson
Calls for maximum compensation is an Alice-in-Wonderland argument that not having to do anything about carbon trading will provide companies with an incentive to do something. 

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