EDITORS' PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide, Gottliebsen looks at how Telstra and BHP will perform in 2010, Bartholomeusz explains why central banks need to wean themselves off stimulus measures and Oderberg examines Google's new smartphone.

Thodey's other problem
Robert Gottliebsen
The biggest challenge facing David Thodey in 2010 is not the negotiations with the government on the national broadband network – it's the revamp of the company's customer service network.

BHP's 2010 challenges
Robert Gottliebsen
With a balance sheet that's starting to look flabby, BHP must start spending its $35 billion-plus war chest. But will it buy back its UK offshoot or embark on a buying spree?

Time to pay the piper
Stephen Bartholomeusz
The Fed minutes are a reminder that central banks must wean their systems off emergency stimulus measures and that the process has to start this year – probably sooner rather than later.

Two-for-one budget airlines
Stephen Bartholomeusz
The alliance between Jetstar and AirAsia suggests the battle for low-cost carrier supremacy in the world’s fastest-growing market is entering a decisive phase. 

Believe the Google phone hype
Isabelle Oderberg
Google has released its Nexus One smartphone. While it won't knock the iPhone off its perch immediately, its compelling features mean long-term market dominance is more than possible.

Is that hot enough?
Giles Parkinson
The Bureau of Meteorology says the past decade was the hottest on record, but that is unlikely to move Australia's policy-makers to action – though some of our major competitors are taking the risks more seriously.

A new era for talent management
Dianne Jacobs
If you want the best people, ask them how they want to work – and reap the benefits.

Carrying too much risk
Bill Gross, Pimco
Most carry trades in credit, duration and the currency space may be at risk in the first half of 2010 as the markets readjust to the absence of their government stimulus 'sugar daddy'. 

TALKING DIGITAL: Lost in transmission
Ben Shepherd
Rupert Murdoch is not only fighting to monetise content online – he's after the TV dollar too.