EDITORS' PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide, Kohler flips economic ideology on its head, Gottliebsen examines the flow of money between the US and China, while Bartholomeusz says the collapsed iron ore joint venture won't hurt BHP or Rio much at all.


The great currency rip-off can't last
Alan Kohler
Developed nations that previously relied on credit growth to stoke demand are now trying to steal demand from each other via competitive currency devaluation. The big risk is that the currency war will soon become a trade war.

Marx's great capitalist creation
Alan Kohler
Look beyond who 'owns' capital in China and Australia, and a strange paradox is observable. We are, in effect, the socialists. And it's China's aggressive 'capitalism' that make it terrified of a rising yuan.

Budgeting for global turmoil
Robert Gottliebsen
We are watching a dramatic game of global money flows which is changing the shape of the world. Inevitably Australia becomes caught in the swirl.

Australia's rare earth potential
Robert Gottliebsen
The market for rare earth metals is effectively locked up by China at present. But that dominance won't last forever – Australia may yet become a key player.

Sweet sorrow in the Pilbara
Stephen Bartholomeusz
With the financial crisis behind Rio and BHP, the demise of their joint venture is an irritant rather than anything that will strip material value from either company.

Swan's secret surplus recipe
Stephen Bartholomeusz
To reveal the rationale behind the MRRT revenue forecasts would betray confidential talks with the miners and the national interest, claims Wayne Swan. However, the government's budget surplus estimates are otherwise meaningless.

BT's lesson for Conroy's NBN
Rob Burgess
A small-scale broadband roll-out in England's bucolic Cornwall is a good example of what the NBN might have been.

SCOREBOARD: RBA's rates realism
Adam Carr
A November rate hike is now likely, but there will be plenty of data between now and then that could change the RBA's view.

Curing the credit cancer
Steve Keen
If we're going to stop the use of credit for speculation, we must curb the willingness of borrowers to take on debt rather than limiting bank lending directly.

Our non-existent housing bubble
John Wilson, PIMCO
Despite all the talk of a housing bubble, a closer look at the historical metrics of Australia's mortgage markets shows stable, rather than speculative growth.

The small Australia nightmare
Oliver Marc Hartwich
A new book exploring the devastating effects of a declining birth rate in an ageing population shows Australia has its population debate the wrong way around.

How Abbott can win on IR
Nicholas Way
There's a clear push within the Coalition, particularly from the key mining states, for a tougher stance on IR. But with Work Choices dead and buried, it's time for some intellectual dexterity on the issue.