Editor's Picks

In this week's essential reading guide, Kohler looks at the great war between finance and technology, Gottliebsen dissects the federal government’s plans for the auto industry and Bartholomeusz chastises Joe Hockey.

Hockey fails the leadership test on GrainCorp
Rob Burgess
In rejecting Archer Daniels Midland’s GrainCorp takeover, the Treasurer has not only shown disregard for our national interest but contradicted his own party's promise that Australia is 'open for business'.

ADM's rejection goes against the grain of logic
Stephen Bartholomeusz
Joe Hockey was unconvincing in his dismissal of ADM's bid for GrainCorp. His decision denies Australian agribusiness of much-needed capital and sends a troubling message to foreign investors.

The great war between finance and technology
Alan Kohler
The world’s third great technological revolution is upon us – and posing an existential threat to banks. But there’s no stopping the wave of cheap global labour and technology.

Macfarlane's plan to save the car industry
Robert Gottliebsen
The motor industry has come under severe pressure in recent years, with many predicting its imminent demise. Resources and Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane has a very different outlook.

Tensions give ADM a grainy outlook
Stephen Bartholomeusz
Archer Daniels Midland's declaration of its capital commitments to GrainCorp and price restrictions on grain-handling charges have helped assuage local growers' fears. But politics may yet get in the way.

Let's get negative about negative gearing
Rob Burgess
Negative gearing should be on the Coalition's long-term chopping block. Easing out the costly housing distortion could save $5 billion in structural deficit and maybe, if properly explained, win back a vote or two.

Are bubble worries overblown?
Kirstie Spicer
While some equity markets are touching all-time highs, investors would be wise to wait for corporate revenue growth to play catch-up.

Get smart or face infrastructure chaos
Callam Pickering
With budgets getting squeezed tighter and tighter, governments are likely to shy away from funding large-scale infrastructure projects. For Philip Lowe, the key is not avoiding debt but spending more wisely.

Budgeting was easier when life was brutish and short
Alan Kohler
Is lifting the pension age to 70 feasible? For the Grattan Institute and Productivity Commission it’s the only way to avoid a perpetually sick federal budget.

Goldman's Aussie short game
Daniel Palmer
Goldman Sachs recommends cashing in on the weakening Aussie dollar – which could be as low as 85 cents by late 2014 – as a number one trade for the coming year.

The never-ending retail red carpet
Hannah Francis
Retail is doing its best to spoil customers rotten. Data spills from customers, but where it gets tricky is how to refine and use it – all in pursuit of the golden 'return on relationship'.

China's salami-slicing is dicey diplomacy
John Lee
China is making a series of small but aggressive moves to change the regional maritime and territorial status quo by stealth. It's a strategy that could result in disastrous diplomatic consequences.

Game on: Sony's play for a niche audience
Michael Irving
The PS4's strict focus on gamers is a significant point of difference from Microsoft's multi-tasking Xbox One. Will its gamble pay off?

A gas crisis ... but demand crumbles
Tristan Edis
AEMO projects NSW could face gas shortages by 2018, yet domestic gas demand is crumbling and won't recover to 2012 levels until as late as 2030.

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