Australian laggards in the new car order

This week's graphs of the week highlight just how far Australia has fallen behind the world in fuel economy standards, as well as offering a sneak peak at the future for passenger cars. Hybrids, it seems, will be dominant by 2030.

This week's charts of the week show the projected car efficiencies of other developed countries (except Japan) and the technological advancements that have enabled improved fuel economy. Australia's proposed fuel economy standard for 2024 is seemingly a step in the right direction but how do we stack up against our allies? Not too well, it appears.


Source: BP Energy Outlook 2030 Booklet.

The chart, plotting fuel economy in litres per 100km, clearly demonstrates Australia's 2024 projection of 6.7L/100km lags behind the rest. Light vehicles in the US have a projection of around 6L/100km, China is better at around 4.5-5L/100km and Europe is best at less than 4L/100km.

To put things in perspective, in accordance with this graph, Europe is more fuel efficient now than Australia will be in 2024. As a side note, the Ford Falcon's fuel consumption has barely improved since 2000, floating at around 10-11L/100km.

The chart below illustrates the projected make-up of passenger cars in the future.

Source: BP Energy Outlook 2030 Booklet.

Right now over 90 per cent of the passenger car market is petrol/gas powered. In 2030, this percentage is expected to be less than 40. As more hybrid cars hit the streets and impact less on consumers' hip pocket, carmakers need to improve fuel efficiencies in order to keep up. Maybe Ford Australia has learnt this lesson the hard way.

What this data clearly indicates is that Australia has fallen by the wayside when it comes to fuel economy policy and many overseas carmakers are adapting to consumers' wants much more rapidly than their Australian counterparts.