EDITORS' PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide Kohler says we don't need another banking inquiry, Gottliebsen warns local investors about the SGX takeover, Bartholomeusz details Canada's BHP betrayal and Maley explains why QE2 could all be in vain.

Wallis weary
Alan Kohler
By all means, as Joe Hockey suggests, we should re-examine the risk weightings of business loans secured by residential property. But another Wallis Inquiry? That we do not need.

What ASX shareholders could lose
Robert Gottliebsen
The Singapore bid for the ASX is not good for Sydney and Australia, but figures emerging from Singapore show that the takeover might also be bad for both long-term ASX shareholders and the Australian stock market.

Why BHP's Potash bid failed
Robert Gottliebsen
BHP could have won its bid for PotashCorp if it had listened to its fastest growing class of shareholder – self-managed super funds. A bit of relationship repair with Canada's biggest trading partner would also have helped.

Canada's BHP betrayal
Stephen Bartholomeusz
By blocking BHP Billiton's bid for Potash Corp, Canada has damaged its international reputation. Marius Kloppers must now consider returning a huge amount of capital to BHP shareholders.

Westpac's new impairment
Stephen Bartholomeusz
Westpac’s impressive result will fuel the hysteria about bank gouging through mortgage rates, but that view conveniently ignores where most of the bank's profit actually comes from.

Is Ben's money for nothing?
Karen Maley
The $600 billion the Fed plans to spend on treasuries is designed to boost both business investment and consumption. But can it work, given that businesses already have access to cheap funds and consumers are busy paying down debt?

CBA's bold move may backfire
Karen Maley
Commonwealth Bank boss Ralph Norris is playing a dangerous game with his decision to lift home loan and business lending rates by almost twice as much as the Reserve Bank’s official rate rise.

What if Hockey's revolution succeeds?
Rob Burgess
Just like Barack Obama is finding out in the mid-term elections, Labor too will discover that regardless of the economic reality it's what the voters believe that counts – and they seem to believe Joe.

Obama's loss can be Gillard's gain
Michael Gawenda
The drubbing the Democrats have taken in the US at the polls provides the Gillard government with a valuable lesson. And, that's the resolve to eschew poll-driven policies regardless of the consequences.

CLIMATE SPECTATOR: No, they couldn't
Giles Parkinson
US midterm election results suggest Obama will join a long line of presidents unable to deliver on promises of energy independence and reform. Meanwhile, California tells a different story.

Why should economists all think alike?
Steve Keen
If economic research is to be of any use in predicting future crises, some big changes are needed to the way in which such research is funded.

Swan should take his banking medicine
Joe Hockey
By thumbing its nose at the RBA and our insipid Treasurer, the CBA has shown we need a new social contract between the banks and the community. Encouraging competition doesn't need to be this hard.

The EU's win-win losers
Oliver Marc Hartwich
The different interpretations of new euro stability rules reflect the weird logic behind European policymaking, which produces compromises that please everyone without solving the underlying problems.

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