EDITORS' PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide Kohler explains why the current oil shock could end in disaster, Gottliebsen spies a cloud over coal-seam gas, Bartholomeusz finds a fork in Fairfax's road and Maley explains why a US recession would be fatal.

Two oil shocks in one
Alan Kohler
The two previous oil crises were the result of a revolution and a demand spike respectively. This time both are happening together, risking disastrous damage to the global recovery.

The G20 has reached its tipping point
Alan Kohler
With the G20's painstaking discussions over global imbalances on the weekend producing yet another set of vague guidelines, it's evident the G20 is simply too big to prevail.

A cloud over coal-seam gas
Robert Gottliebsen
A ground-up revolt from farmers and environmentalists will cause havoc for coal-seam gas players if they do not change their management style. By racing to develop reserves, they threaten the entire industry.

Two holes in AXA's valuation
Robert Gottliebsen
If the bid for AXA APH goes through in its present form, regulators and the deal's advisors should hang their heads in shame. ASIC must wake up and demand the bid documents reflect the true value of AXA APH's assets.

A fork in Fairfax's road
Stephen Bartholomeusz
As Fairfax continues to emphasise the digital sphere, a recent revenue slowdown has prompted the group to be remarkably open-ended on its forecasts.

Shielding Seven from the NBN
Stephen Bartholomeusz
In a post-NBN future, where advances in high-definition video are expected to hit traditional media companies, WAN's proposed purchase of Seven Media makes a certain kind of sense for both groups.

A US recession would be fatal
Karen Maley
Fears that soaring oil prices will push the global economy into recession come at the worst possible time for the US, with one analyst saying it is in the 'worst pre-recession position ever experienced'.
Could oil derail our boom?
Karen Maley
While oil prices continue to surge, prices on the London Metals Exchange fell overnight, raising fears that Australia's resources boom is on shakier foundations that many believe.

Let the carbon wars begin
Rob Burgess
The pain of structural adjustment to a lower-carbon economy appears to be something Australian voters are increasingly willing to grin and bear. When that money disappears from their bank accounts this may change.

NBN critics are arguing with physics
Rob Burgess
Considering there are physical limits to the amount of data that can be transmitted across the spectrum available for broadband that is truly 'wireless', talk of 4G dominance in Australia or anywhere else is simply weird science.

A more devastating earthquake
Craig Ebert, Bank of New Zealand
While many are speculating New Zealand's cash rate will be cut following this week's devastating earthquake, all signs point to the Reserve Bank of New Zealand taking a more thought-out approach.

Is the MBA obsolete?
Martha Maznevski
Is the MBA still a good way to prepare business leaders in an increasingly complex world?

The subtext of REDGroup's collapse
Josh Dowse
Brick and mortar bookshops are still essential to a healthy book retailing system but, as REDGroup's collapse shows, the industry must fundamentally realign itself to realise their potential.

India is losing the G20 faith
Francis Xavier Rathinam, Parthasarathi Shome
Much attention was paid to China's demands at the G20, but India's list of concerns about the G20 being closed and unbalanced is growing.

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