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In this week's essential reading guide Kohler considers a Chinese free-for-all, Gottliebsen argues Australia can win the milk war, Pickering diagnoses ills in Australia's housing market and Burgess calls time on carbon warfare.

China’s ‘wall of money’
Alan Kohler
An unprecedented liberalisation of financial markets in China is expected at the next CCP meeting. This financial free-for-all would have huge consequences around the world.

How Australia can win the milk war
Robert Gottliebsen
Australia can be the major player in international dairy. If Murray Goulburn can acquire Warrnambool and keep Canada out, it will be able to match the mighty New Zealand.

Housing is Australia’s great boondoggle
Callam Pickering
If Joe Hockey's audit committee is serious about eliminating wasted government expenditure, the sacred cow of housing subsidisation must come to an end.

Running of the market bulls
Stephen Koukoulas
This stock market recovery is based on sounder fundamentals than the 2007 peaks. But it has a long way to run, and by the end of 2014 a 10 per cent rise could be on the cards.

The UN calls time on our carbon wars
Rob Burgess
While carbon trench warfare rules in Canberra, power supply is in a world of trouble. The UN's position shows it's time to disarm.

Two better heads for Abbott’s audit
Alan Kohler
The new leaders of Tony Abbott's audit commission will be able to hit the ground running. That's important – it's a critical opportunity for Australia.

Why Sinodinos is hanging his job on super
Robert Gottliebsen
Arthur Sinodinos knows his role is to protect the current superannuation benefits. He also knows the ATO needs to be straightened out on the rules for independent contractors.

Treasury Wine toasts America for the long haul
Victoria Thieberger
Treasury Wine Estates' renewed US strategy is seeing it double down on the troubled market. But a softening China could present a different kind of problem entirely.

The Chinese baby boom fuelling Warrnambool’s favour
Miranda Maxwell
China’s growing middle class has fuelled an explosion in demand for dairy produce, and a relaxing of the one-child policy would mean many more little emperors for WCB to feed.

The folly of Shorten’s knee-jerk attack
Rob Burgess
Bill Shorten sees eye-to-eye with BCA chief Tony Shepherd on more policies than he'd care to admit. Sniping from the sidelines will do little to achieve a coherent vision for economic reform.

Telstra’s softly, softly start-up strategy
James Riley
Telstra is trying something new with its start-up incubator, muru-D. Despite its track record of consuming companies whole or tearing them apart for the sake of useful innovation, Telstra is attempting to facilitate start-ups without smothering them.

One year on, Xi Jinping still has everyone guessing
Geoff Raby
Xi Jinping’s flirtation with the left may seem odd for someone who was a victim of Mao's excesses. But is he simply signaling left in preparation to turn right?

Smooth online operators storm the high street
Hannah Francis
The latest breed of retail disrupters are moving online apparel into the bricks and mortar space – and bringing a leaner, meaner business model with them.

Innovation is no longer Apple's core strategy
Harrison Polites
Apple's reluctance to integrate NFC technology into its devices has forced its competitors to take risks where it won't. Has its innovative edge been blunted?

Killing off the lagging indicators
Daniel Palmer
An American upstart is taking a huge leap in the stagnant world of data collection. Making economic indicators available every hour, rather than every quarter will change how markets work.

Big government makes Europe a no-grow zone
Oliver Marc Hartwich
Unwieldy state tentacles are strangling Europe's economic advancement, with government still responsible for over 45 per cent of GDP. If the region wants to grow, it must downsize.

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