EDITOR'S PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide, Kohler takes aim at property shysters, Koukoulas examines the US shutdown fallout, Burgess tells Hockey to hit the road and Gottliebsen eyes Sinodinos' SMSF plans.

The trouble with SMSF property

Alan Kohler

Many self-funded superannuation fund holders already feel the market is rigged against them. Now they have property shysters looking to get at them too.

 

The Republic of Crazy

Stephen Koukoulas

At $US300 million a day and counting, the economic fallout from the US government shutdown could be just a taste of things to come if Republicans continue to hijack budgetary process.

 

Why the Gillard memory won't be easily forgotten

Michael Gawenda

The Labor Party may want to forget about the Gillard and Rudd years, but the overwhelming show of love for Julia Gillard in Sydney and Melbourne shows that the Labor has some soul-searching left to do.

 

Is Sinodinos stalking self-managed super?

Robert Gottliebsen

Big superannuation firms appear to have convinced Arthur Sinodinos that self-managed super funds have it too easy. It’s a strategy they’ve used before to try to protect their fat fees.

 

Gear up, Hockey – it's time to get on the roads

Rob Burgess

Many sectors of the economy are teetering on the edge of deflation, although you'd never know it from the Coalition's bluster. But 15 years of inadequate infrastructure spending might change Hockey's tune.

 

Carbon price now appears dead

Tristan Edis

After the Palmer United Party's - surprise - third Senate spot, the government now only needs one of two micro-party senators to vote for carbon price repeal.

 

Local retailers may bake in Uniqlo's glow

Hannah Francis

Struggling retailers will quake at the imminent arrival of Japanese fast-fashion behemoth Uniqlo. They'll need to adapt to survive.

 

One-eyed ideology could wreck the Senate

Rob Burgess

With our new Senate shaping up to produce a very diverse range of views, political brinkmanship akin to what's unfolding in the US is equally possible in Australia.

 

Shutdown: be afraid, but not very afraid

Alan Kohler

The decision on a shutdown will be made by 2pm today. Surely Republicans aren’t radical enough to torpedo the American and world economy over ideology... or are they?

 

Prison may unlock a political opportunity for Bo Xilai

John Lee

China's leaders are hoping that a life sentence will solve the political problem of Bo Xilai. But if things go pear-shaped for the Chinese economy, Bo Xilai may reemerge as a viable socialist alternative.

 

Political risks will deepen eurozone woes

Oliver Marc Hartwich

Question marks are hanging over the future of European politics in Italy, Austria and Germany. Such widespread political uncertainty will wreak havoc on markets.

 

Will the NBN be 'affordable' without Huawei?

Mark Gregory

The Coalition has promised to review Huawei's lock-out from NBN tenders. But bringing the Chinese giant back on the NBN table won't be easy unless Turnbull is willing to stand up to US pressure.

 

SMSFs can be infrastructure's driving force

Robert Gottliebsen

Tony Abbott's plan to offset the mining slowdown is to turbocharge infrastructure investment. SMSFs would happily fund new projects if the PM can sell the 'user pays' model.

 

Underestimate the US shutdown at your peril

Kirstie Spicer

Extreme caution is the name of the game as the world's largest economy begins a partial government shutdown.

 

In Asia, Packer eyes his high-roller haven

Victoria Thieberger

James Packer's efforts to corner the lucrative high-roller segment in Asia may come to fruition, with the Japanese government due to consider a bill that would allow the development of casinos.

 

Why Obama's hope didn't translate

Phil Quin

President Obama is now less popular with the voters than George W. Bush was. Is he a victim of his era, or it could be that he isn't a particularly good politician?

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