Promises, promises

John Robertson will zero in on Barry O'Farrell's most controversial decisions, with a string of promises to wind back workers' compensation changes, reintroduce the ban on hunting in national parks and re-open Grafton jail.

John Robertson will zero in on Barry O'Farrell's most controversial decisions, with a string of promises to wind back workers' compensation changes, reintroduce the ban on hunting in national parks and re-open Grafton jail.

The NSW Opposition Leader also pledged to fund 800 university scholarships to train maths and science teachers if Labor can somehow recover from the state's biggest landslide election defeat to recapture power in 2015.

Addressing Labor's state conference at Town Hall yesterday, Mr Robertson savaged Mr O'Farrell.

"You cannot trust this Premier and you cannot trust this government," he told 850 delegates.

"The public are watching and like a tide that slowly rises, the people are beginning to realise how deceptive Barry O'Farrell really is."

Among the delegates was Denise Seal, a carer for people with disabilities who voted against Mr Robertson in his seat of Blacktown at last year's election.

She injured her knee while grocery shopping for someone in her care and has been forced to cash in her superannuation to live after being cut from workers' compensation.

Under the O'Farrell government's reforms, Ms Seal has had to abandon any hope of fighting the decision as the legal costs she could face are too great.

"No one should have to face what Denise is going through," said Mr Robertson.

"The first act of Labor in government will be to scrap Barry O'Farrell's workers' compensation laws."

With temperatures still high in Grafton where 100 prison workers lost their jobs last week after the closure of the town's jail, Mr Robertson promised to re-open the 119-year-old facility despite the government's insistence it was costing the state millions of dollars to keep it open.

Mr Robertson saved some of his venom for the O'Farrell government's decision to allow recreational shooters into national parks.

"In a single grubby deal with the Shooters and Fishers Party, Barry O'Farrell has broken his promise and opened up our pristine national parks to amateur hunters. Shooters with high-powered weapons can now traipse through the parks we once camped in and bushwalked through with our kids," he said.

While Mr Robertson's promises are largely meaningless, nearly three years out from the next state election, which no one expects Labor to win, he did address some of the past failures that still haunt the ALP.

"Sadly for us, even today, the ghosts of Labor's past still occasionally emerge to embarrass us. You know who they are. I don't need to name them."

That was because they had been splashed over the front page of The Sydney Morning Herald on Thursday. Former minister Ian Macdonald, and former MPs Angela D'Amore and Karyn Paluzzano were suspended from the party after being shamed in front of the ICAC.

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