EDITORS' PICKS

In this week's essential reading guide Kohler grades Tony Abbott's carbon plans, Gottliebsen examines what's behind the market turmoil, Bartholomeusz explains the RBA's caution, and Maley reviews the unfolding Greek tragedy.

A download dilemma for Conroy
Alan Kohler
While ISPs are celebrating iiNet's legal victory, the federal government knows it has tough decisions to make on copyright theft if the NBN is to be workable.

Abbott's great big axe
Alan Kohler
Tony Abbott's climate plan looks capable of slicing off 5 per cent of Australia's carbon emissions at a stroke. And while it still represents a 'great big tax' for Australian voters, it's not as big as Labor's.

Behind the market frenzy
Robert Gottliebsen
Traders were in a minor panic last night as they sensed trouble from Greece and the European markets. The implications for Australia could be severe.

Democracy devouring itself
Robert Gottliebsen
Populist policies around the world may be winning the hearts and minds of voters, but they are threatening to undermine the drivers of economic prosperity.

The Conroy curse
Stephen Bartholomeusz
Australia's official auditors have reviewed the original tender process used for the national broadband network and it's not the best report card for the government, especially regarding Telstra.

Bad news for banks
Stephen Bartholomeusz
The Reserve Bank's decision to leave the interest rate unchanged denies the big banks the free pass to recover interest margin foregone through increased funding costs.

Inching towards a trade war
Karen Maley
The US has stepped up its rhetoric against China's artificially devalued currency. Against a backdrop of low growth in Europe and the US, international trade could get nasty very quickly.

Greece's crisis is contagious
Karen Maley
We should all be watching the unfolding Greek drama with close interest, because how it plays out will ultimately affect how much we pay on our own home loans. 4 Feb 2010 7:54 AM

Carbon copy
Giles Parkinson
The Coalition's climate change policy is strikingly similar to the Rudd government's, in that both studiously ignore the need for the Australian economy to make any sort of concession to global warming.

The holes in China's accounts
Q&A by Isabelle Oderberg
Much of China's economic data doesn't add up, says Hong Kong-based economist David O'Rear, who also warns that China will face a banking crisis in the next five years.

Is China exploiting ASEAN?
Sarah Danckert
The free trade agreement between China and six ASEAN nations, just a month old, is already under fire from within the signatory nations.